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Opinion > Columns
Industry experts and KM leaders share their ideas about the state of Knowledge Management in the world today and where it is going.

Nominations for the 2022 KMWorld Readers’ Choice Awards Extended to July 5

Fusion, fission, or something else?

When it comes to applying KM, the key is identifying and connecting the dots in meaningful and synergistic ways.

Knowledge unchained

Blockchains eliminate the need to trust other people. That's it; that is all there is to it. Trust is deferred to the system itself.

Thinking fast—and faster

If you're going to achieve consistent, effective high-speed decision making, it can't involve a protracted review by upper management.

Why predict?

Predictions can be used to try to get to the bottom of something in the present. That's often the case with arguments about what the web will do to us and society.

The state of knowledge

The new norm is for us to learn in public and to share what we have learned.

The way of the scenario

The Delphi technique has become less effective in recent years, especially in crisis situations in which conditions, assumptions, and other variables are changing faster than the group is able to respond.

From robots to digital workers

As more firms use the term "digital workers" in place of bots, a spotlight is being shone on the role, importance, and increasing controversy surrounding enterprise automation.

Can AI be ethical?

Without inherent bias in the data, AI would not make decisions. Bizarre though it may seem, AI is dependent on bias being present.

The end of books?

The structure of knowledge is dense, and our paths through it are carved not just by itscontours but by our interests and concerns.

The privilege of free speech

The best counter to a bad idea was not to suppress it but to put forth a better idea or so we believed. That belief and the U.S. Constitution's guarantee of free speech resulted from the Enlightenment commitment to reason.

How we innovate matters

Just as nobody was fooled by the arguments used to justify offshoring and outsourcing business processes, they should also not be misled by the furious energy behind automation, be it in the form of RPA or even AI.

The coming blue wave

It should come as no surprise that topping the list of requirements to create and sustain a vibrant blue economy are innovation, learning, and collaboration.

At long last, the conference of the future

In past epochs, usually when a civilization is at or near its peak, the architecture of prominent structures masterfully blends the physical and the cognitive.… we need to be thinking along the same lines as we build platforms for interacting in an increasingly virtual world, including virtual conferences.

A little eternal knowledge is a dangerous thing

Even if our business knowledge were as eternal and omnipresent as Newton's laws, we'd still have to apply that knowledge to a world that is unfathomably complex and ever-changing.

Data is never just data

As with all tools, data has uses because of complex contexts that include other objects, physics, social norms, social institutions, and human intentions.

Thinking about KM differently

Moving to a push rather than a pull mentality simply means that we now have the technology to tag, manage, and interpret information automatically and near instantly—automatically pushing the right information to the right person (or application) at the right time.

Thinking beyond the status quo

The technologies exist today to achieve almost any corporate or departmental goal. What is lacking is the nerve to think big and think beyond the status quo—to break barriers, to collaborate, and to share.

Building the enterprise of the future: If not now, when ?

It should be plainly clear that we need knowledge management now more than ever. You can be sure that the COVID-19 crisis won't be the last crisis to come our way. And the next one might be even more severe because our supporting systems have taken some serious hits.

Links then and now

Broken links used to be like potholes. Now there are entire neighborhoods that are gone.

The challenge of emergence

Traditionally, we humans have succeeded at building complex structures by breaking plans down into a multitude of simple, predictable, knowable causes and effects.