Biographical Information

Alan Pelz-Sharpe

Founder, Deep Analysis

Alan Pelz-Sharpe has more than 25 years of experience in the IT industry, working with a wide variety of end-user organizations such as FedEx, Mayo Clinic, and Allstate and vendors ranging from Oracle and IBM to startups around the world. He was previously a partner at The Real Story Group, consulting director at Wipro, research director at 451, and vice president for North America at Ovum. He is regularly quoted in the press, including The Wall Street Journal and The Guardian, and he has appeared on the BBC, CNBC, and ABC as an expert guest.

Articles by Alan Pelz-Sharpe

Thinking beyond the status quo

The technologies exist today to achieve almost any corporate or departmental goal. What is lacking is the nerve to think big and think beyond the status quo—to break barriers, to collaborate, and to share.

The right time for knowledge management

A new generation is coming in—one that sees order in the chaos, spots previously invisible patterns, and not only embraces technology but grew up with it.

The truth and chatbots

A chatbot is a digital language processing service, powered by rules and artificial intelligence that simulates human-like conversation.

Renting KM applications in the CLOUD

The fact is that enterprise needs are complex, and running software on somebody else's infrastructure doesn't take away that complexity. The technology is not the critical failure point these days; it's the application of that technology that falls apart.

Social intranets and the supply chain

Video instant messaging: a misunderstood KM disrupter

Due to ever-falling costs, high-availability data connections, smart mobile devices and the growth of cloud computing, knowledge management and enterprise collaboration in general are undergoing something of a rebirth.

Rethinking enterprise social networks

Outside the organization, too, where social media has the reach and critical mass to make it a viable channel for customer interaction, enterprises are learning that its true value is in helping support the totality of its business activities....

KM in the cloud

"In 2012, every vendor of KM-related technology has a cloud offering and uses the term in as many marketing messages as possible"...

Tracing the ancestry of a product

When organizations buy knowledge and information management technology, they often do so from trusted and preferred suppliers. On the surface, that approach makes a great deal of sense, but a closer look at what is being sold will occasionally make you think twice. Information and knowledge management technology offerings would appear to have evolved in terms of complexity and breadth over the past decade. Yet, some offerings on sale today have long and sometimes infamous heritages, even though their branding and marketing may suggest they are shiny new and "cutting edge." Gaining an understanding of a product's ancestry is essential work to undertake for any technology buyer in today's market.

“Content” technology predictions for 2010

What’s all the hype about?

SharePoint 2010: It's worth looking at SharePoint 2010, what it promises and why so much buzz is being generated.

A component approach to content

In the multichannel, customer-driven world in which we live, the pressure to meet ever-increasing information demands has never been more acute or complex. Yet, the birth of the Extensible Markup Language (XML) file format and the component content management (CCM) systems that leverage XML provide us with the tools to meet those demands. But tools are just that, tools to be used, and without a broader understanding and strategy for their use, they are of little value...

A standard with a chance of success

What is e-mail archiving and management?

You know you have an e-mail management problem, but what kind of problem? Defining the exact nature of your problem can be half the battle to finding a solution.

ECM Market Overview 2008

Without doubt, 2007 was an important transitional year for enterprise content management (ECM). We saw the emergence of the MOI vendors—Microsoft, Oracle and IBM—as serious players in the market, with the dual, and frequently contradictory, goals of bringing ECM to the masses and delivering sweeping content services as core infrastructure.

HOSTED SOLUTIONS: (SaaS): SpringCM

ECM consolidation continues

KM in an unwired enterprise

The eternal document question

Breaking free of the desktop

Knowledge management—Past and future

The electronic records management challenge

Analyst report: FileNet P8

Who knows whom and what

Records management redux: the nudge toward compliance

Turbulent times for DAM

Enterprise content management: Is it anything new?

The next generation of search

The need for portals

E-process technology: Heading in the right direction

Content management tools help support KM solutions

Content management tools help support KM solutions