KMWorld Cover

May 2012, [Volume 21, Issue 5]

Features

Three hot issues in records management

"The user should not be a de facto records manager, now that methods of doing it automatically are available."...

Focus on KM in higher education:
Learning analytics efforts apply business intelligence to student retention.

The term "learning analytics" seems to have a number of definitions, but it basically involves using predictive analytic tools to improve learning and education...

KM supports open government

"Now that everyone can see the data and come to their own conclusions. the concept of transparency is proving to be very effective."...

Adaptive case management—A new approach for achieving goals

The KMWorld Hall of Distinction 2012

The knowledge movement: trends and opportunities

The true success of KM is when it disappears, meaning that KM processes are embedded in workflow...

KMWorld Hall of Distinction 2012: Concept Searching

KMWorld Hall of Distinction 2012: Rivet Logic

News Analysis

Xyte's insight into online behaviors

Enterprise search is a touchy-feely service. If you have interviewed potential users of an enterprise information system, you probably have heard, "I prefer a system that works just like Google" or, "I want the system to provide just the information I need." Those types of statements make clear that search is a subjective concept. When search engine expert Steve Arnold expressed his concern with traditional surveys, a colleague suggested that he check in with Dr. Linda McIsaac, whose work involves a next-generation method of determining employee preferences. He asked McIsaac if she would update him on her methods for obtaining statistically valid data about an individual's or a group's preferences. Her company is Xyte, which uses her method described as "human behavior technology." Her work makes it possible to predict employee behavior and translate it into tangible business results. The Xyte approach, according to the company's Web site, is grounded in neuroscience and psychology. In this article, Arnold provides a review.

Personal KM: Tagging for one's self

Our human fuzzy brains can benefit from tagging, but they also make tagging a wee bit flaky...

COLUMNS:

David Weinberger

Where facts become data

Some of the data in these clouds is going to turn out to be inaccurate, but with so much of it openly available, and with the ability to link up data sets, the inaccuracies turn into the equivalent of rounding errors...

The Future of the Future

Smart farms: feeding the world's 7 billion minds

We don't really have a robust, systematic approach for capturing, sharing, applying and growing knowledge about farming. At least not on a grand scale...

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