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Susan Feldman

CEO, Synthexis

Sue Feldman is CEO of Synthexis, e-mail sue@synthexis.com.

Articles by Susan Feldman

Human thinking balances AI systems. They can plug each other's blind spots. Humans make judgments based on their worldview. They are capable of understanding priorities, ethics, values, justice and beauty. Machines can't. But machines can crunch vast volumes of data. Posted July 03, 2017

The fact is that any of the techniques available to the market today for predicting one's actions based on a profile can be important tools, but they cannot, with any great accuracy, predict the behavior of one single individual. They rely on groups of similar individuals to predict the probability of one person's actions. Posted April 29, 2017

We see threat detection emerging as the first cognitive computing application to become prevalent. Major banks, credit risk companies, government customs organizations or security agencies are all investing in cognitive computing because they cannot keep up with the onslaught of data, particularly text. Posted January 30, 2017

Artificial intelligence is a large umbrella term that includes: machine learning of all types, digital assistants, conversational systems, Internet of Things, image and speech recognition, emotion and sentiment detection, cognitive computing, robotics and more. Posted December 30, 2016

The fact is that we are awash in data. Posted September 01, 2016

Cognitive computing systems address complex situations that are characterized by ambiguity and uncertainty—in other words, human kinds of problems. In those dynamic, information-rich and shifting situations, data tends to change frequently, and it is often conflicting. The goals of users evolve as they learn more and redefine their objectives. Posted September 01, 2015

By amassing more information than any of us can individually, and then presenting it in an analytic environment with our problem as the lens, a cognitive app can encourage the intuition and creative imagination of the human expert. Cognitive computing augments the human capacity for taking in random information and combining it in novel ways within the context of a current problem.... Posted March 31, 2015

Computers are one of those artifacts of modern life that we love to hate. They are powerful, pervasive, intrusive and, let's face it, clumsy to use. Today's applications require us to break down complex, subtle ideas into simplistic statements. We must learn arcane codes to speak their language. They are incapable of assisting us in an evolving knowledge voyage because their understanding breaks down as our context or intentions change. Posted October 27, 2014

Cognitive computing should redefine the relationship between people and their digital environment. Context is the new element at the heart of this next computing frontier.... Posted June 27, 2014

A great search solution requires more than a search engine. Search engines are useful technologies. But to transform a technology into something... Posted May 01, 2008

We know that knowledge workers spend a large percentage of their time looking for information. What are they looking for and where are they looking? In fall 2007, we set about trying to find out. In conjunction with KMWorld and IDC's Technology Advisory Panel, we asked participants to tell us how long they spent searching, what their typical questions were, and where they went (online or print) to find the information they needed. Posted February 29, 2008

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Posted October 01, 2004

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